Cleaning up in the Carnegie Birthplace Museum

Thanks once more to the wonderful folk at the Andrew Carnegie Birthplace Museum for making us so welcome!

Yet another busy meeting, with Alexander, Algirdas, Archie, Brian, Brodie, Katie, Michal, Nicoleta, Olivia, Ronan and Sienna making it along. Daniel and Andrew Bell tried their best to make it too, but alas, their car broke down en route.

It was a very different meeting to the usual sort. We were joined by Stuart of Youth 1st, who through activity, presentation and brainstorming got us all thinking about leadership in general and youth leadership in particular. Interested members will have the opportunity to join Youth 1st’s programme, with contemporaries from other youth groups, to undertake training and ultimately organise their own events intended to encourage young folk to lead more active lives.

After all that moving around and thinking, we stopped for a wee break and then got down to some therapeutic artefact cleaning. Three trays and a washing up bowl full of bone, pottery and glass (including a marble) were beautifully and carefully washed and laid out to dry, ready for sorting.

Bone identification in progress
Bone identification in progress
Toothbrushes deployed
Toothbrushes deployed
Cleaning is fun!
Cleaning is fun (but don’t tell my mum)!
Mark, look what I found!
Mark, look what I found!

 

Graveyard Dig Day 39

I’m very, very late posting this entry. Sorry 🙁

It is at least still just August!

First day working in Dunfermline Abbey Graveyard for a while. We had a really good turn out with Anna, Archie, Brodie, Emily, Keziah, Lee, Michal, Nicoleta and Olivia all working hard.

We have yet another gravestone to investigate, very awkwardly positioned and with a curb, just to make it even more problematic, as you can see below. Archie excavated part of what might have been a coffin handle. Once we have been able to record this stone we will be able to start shunting the fence along towards fresh, unexcavated ground.

Exposing a curb stone as only YC members can
Exposing a curb stone as only YC members can

Rob devoted himself to the passing on of bone knowledge to a much, much younger generation. There was much sorting and identification of fragments of human bone.

The oracle speaketh unto his acolytes
The oracle speaketh unto his disciples
Identification and sorting of bones
Identification and sorting of bones

As usual, sieving of spoil returned a good haul of finds missed during excavation, including bone and clay tobacco pipe fragments.

A pair of sievers sieving
A pair of sievers sieving

Henry took charge of excavating the latest test trench, which is producing a familiar mix of rubbly soil with broken glass, pottery and bone fragments. We are still to high to see if we will come down onto the thick rubble that lies to the south and west of the pit.

Work proceeding in a new test pit
Work proceeding in a new test pit

Graveyard Dig, another day …

On Saturday a small band of leaders, dads and YAC members met up in the Abbey Graveyard for a bit of a tidy up.

The grass is cut
Getting to grips with shears that are too long and the wrong tool for the job. Fun though?
Grass nil, Charlotte 1
Grass nil, Charlotte 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We’ve been working in this corner for nearly a year now; this was our 39th session. The grass hasn’t been cut, weeds have not been pulled and after a period of warmth and rain, both are taking full advantage and growing as fast as they can. Well, we taught mother nature a lesson she’ll soon forget, cutting and pulling away around the trenches, in the trenches, round the gravestone, round and on the spoil heaps. The site is pretty much almost nearly tidy now.

We also took the opportunity to begin backfilling trenches that we have finished working in. The gravestones pinned down by spider-like tree roots have been allowed to resume their slumber under the earth, presumably until the trees are cut or fall, or one of our members realises they lost their smart phone on Saturday.

The main DHCP trench and weird roots
Aggressive protective, or roots that are just there?

 

Sieving and backfilling
The sievers recovered small bones, burnt coal and a nice piece of clay tobacco pipe bowl.

Sieving proved productive and therapeutic. We now have more slightly bone, burnt coal and pottery, including another fragment of clay tobacco pipe, to record.

At rest after trimming the long grass around the gravestones.
At rest after trimming the long grass around the gravestones.

There was even a bit of time for passing on the ancient and venerable art of daisy-chain making and wearing.

Passing on the art of making daisy-chains
An aspect of ancient material culture that survives as an action passed on between generations,  leaving no physical trace.
Daisy-chain deployed
Daisy-chain deployed

Graveyard Dig Day 38

YAC members hard at work, trowels in hand
YAC members hard at work, trowels in hand

It was pleasantly warm, rather than scorchingly hot under the trees in Dunfermline Abbey graveyard today. It’s the time of year when the annual influx of visitors begins. They arrive wondering what on earth we are doing and usually leave interested and impressed by the work and commitment of our young members.

Today our committed members were Aisling, Alexander, new member Campbell, Daniel, Lee and Sienna. They worked at a multiplicity of tasks, from cleaning and sorting bone fragments to sieving and eating lunch.

Campbell made a great start to his archaeological career today. He proved to be a most dedicated digger and made finds both in the trench he was working in and also when sieving spoil. Indeed Campbell made one of the most unusual finds of the project so far; a tiny metal ball, with a hook for fastening. The fact that it completely untarnished suggests that it is made of silver.

The bell that Campbell found
The silver ball that Campbell found

Bones

Some members spent the entire session cleaning and sorting some of the bone fragments and teeth that the excavation has turned up. The human bone will be studied before being reinterred when we backfill the site. In 2015 we found very little bone at all, but the 2016-17 dig has turned up a lot, mostly very fragmented and mixed with rubble deposits and graveyard soil.

Given that the rubble does not originate from the graveyard, but was brought in and spread in 1927, it seems strange that it should contain human bone. The obvious conclusion is that graveyard soil was being excavated and moved as part of the process of levelling.

 

Bones cleaned and bones fragmented
Bones cleaned and bones fragmented

The skull and crossbones area of the dig seems to confirm this. It seems to have been one of the most heavily disturbed areas that we have so far come across. Beneath a thick layer of compacted rubble, earth and clay were four gravestones; the table stone, probably still in situ, bordered by a group of three broken, dumped stones.

Between these we have come across a narrow area packed with bones, including long bones, that seem to have been thrown in, almost like bundles of sticks. This has been the area richest in both disarticulated human longer bones and butchered animal bone so far.

Human bone, dumped between gravestones
Human bone, dumped between gravestones

Recording the site

Aisling spent the last half hour sketching trench sections, one of which is below. She has nicely captured the essential character of much of the site: gravestones sat on or in a layer of rocks, broken brick and dirt (with some bone), beneath which we are finding higher concentrations of disarticulated bone within yet more dirt.

Section sketch drawn by Aisling
Section sketch drawn by Aisling

Graveyard Dig Day 37, cleaning finds again

This was the first ever YAC meeting to take place in the dry, out of the rain, in the Andrew Carnegie Birthplace Museum. We were given a lovely warm welcome by the volunteers on duty and some of us even learned the mysteries of the hot drinks machine. We had a fine turnout: Aisling, Alexander, Andrew, Daniel, Douglas, Katie, Keziah, Kathryn, Lee, Olivia, Ryan and Sienna all working hard.

We focused on sorting and cleaning some of the finds made on site in recent weeks. Leader Laura took charge of the bone table, while Charlotte managed the everything else table.

After a great sorting, the water went into the wash basins and out came the  toothbrushes for the washing.

Cleaning shells and bits of broken stuff
Cleaning shells and bits of broken stuff
YAC members fight over what to clean next
YAC members fight over what to clean next
The bone cleaners doing what they do best
The bone cleaners doing what they do best
Just after one of the bones cleaners mysteriously melted
A moment later one of the bones cleaners mysteriously melted, but the survivors were too professional to run away in terror.
Certain YAC members move too quickly for the human eye to quite perceive
Certain YAC members blur more easily than others
Graveyard relic or YAC member, will we ever really know?
Graveyard relic or YAC member, will we ever really know?
Here we see many YAC members hard at work, watch by about 2/3rds of a leader
Here we see many YAC members hard at work, watch by about 2/3rds of a leader

The Dunfermline Abbey Marbles

On the Web for the first time, the fragments of two marbles found by YAC member Ryan whilst sieving spoil from the graveyard excavation. I suppose they were most likely mixed with the demolition material used as fill in 1927, already broken and discarded.

The Dunfermline Marbles
The Dunfermline Marbles

There was also this rather nice shell fossil found along with mixed human and animal bones last Saturday.

The tiny fossil of a tiny shell
The tiny fossil of a tiny shell

Graveyard Dig Day 36

Another busy couple of hours in the graveyard. Disappointingly, no more buttons were found, but we bore up well in the circumstances. We had another good turn out: Aisling, Alexander, Archie, Katie, Katheryn, Lee, Michal, Olivia and Ryan all doing their bit for Scottish archaeology.

Almost everyone, but not quite
Almost everyone, but not quite

Lee and leader Dougie got tantalisingly close to completing work on the south east frontier. Today yet more fragments of porcelain petal came out, along with a brick and what seems to be a broken ear ring, among other things.

In search of bricks and bone
In search of bricks and bone

The hard, dry ground kept progress fairly slow elsewhere on site. Slowly but surely we are levelling out trenches to the bases of the gravestones we have worked so hard to reveal. There was painstaking excavation of human and animal bone, all of it probably dumped unceremoniously between gravestones during levelling work in 1927. We have started to use wooden ice lolly sticks when working on bone so as not to damage them with our metal trowels.

Finds tray with finds
Finds tray with finds

Sieving buckets of spoil continues to pay dividends. Ryan was lucky enough to discover two fragmented marbles, our first finds of toys on the site.

Are they working, or just pretending to because I wanted a nice photo for the blog?
Are they working, or just pretending to because I wanted a nice photo for the blog?
These people are definitely working, they hadn't even noticed me.
These people are definitely working, they hadn’t even noticed me.
The sieving must go on!
The sieving must go on!
The anonymity of the dig
The anonymity of the dig

Graveyard Dig Day 35

A whole week late, here is a brief report of work on the graveyard dig on April 22nd. I can only apologise to members and leaders alike for my tardiness and assure them that it will almost definitely happen again.

We had a very good turnout today with Aisling, Alexander, Andrew, Archie, Daniel, Douglas, Ella, Katie, Kathryn, Keziah, Michal and Olivia all on site. Once again it was dry, which is all very well, but in places the ground is starting to do a very credible impression of concrete and it’s hard on one’s knees be they young, youngish or oldish (especially when I forget to bring the newly purchased kneeling mats).

Nevertheless, we progressed. Finds were found, edges more clearly defined, trench edges straightened, bottoms levelled, spoil sieved, visitors talked to. Alexander made excellent progress in the south east trench, so it is nearly ready to be recorded. A small number of pieces of butchered animal bone were recovered along with the usual assortment of pottery, disarticulated human remains  and broken glass.

Busy YAC folk at work
Busy YAC folk at work
The sievers sieved
The sievers sieved
The excavators did that ...
The excavators did that …
... in more than one trench at a time!
… in more than one trench at a time!

Button Bonanza

Over the last two weeks two buttons have been found, doubling what is already a very fine collection. Rob found a tiddler of a button the week before while Olivia recovered another metal button in her sieve. This one has a maker stamped on the reverse, so we’ll have to have a proper look under a magnifying glass. Rob’s is the first button we have found that has had a loop rather than holes for sewing onto garments. Given it’s diminutive size it must have fastened something fairly delicate, perhaps a child’s bonnet or some such?

Rob's button, back
Rob’s button, back
Rob's button, front
Rob’s button, front
Olivia's button, back
Olivia’s button, back
Olivia's button, front
Olivia’s button, front

Graveyard Dig Day 34

A bright, sunny, windy and freezing day that only Aisling was dressed for, so we put her in charge.

Douglas was given the task of excavating the flowerpot interior, which he did with considerable care. He found fragments of what may have been thick, rusted wire or pins. We speculated that they may once have supported the flowers we found on Thursday.

Rusty wire? Found in the flower pot
Rusty wire? Found in the flowerpot
The rose what we found on Thursday
The rose what we found on Thursday

Douglas also retrieved a fragment of a coloured glassy material, a pit of pot and broken glass.

Pretty glass from the flower pot
Pretty glass from the flowerpot
The flower pot is empty
The flower pot is empty

Meanwhile Aisling worked with Rob and Charlotte in the “Trench of Bigness”. More bone, a bit of nail and a rather interesting button were amongst the finds they made.

Rob thinks about making a grab for the ear muffs
Rob thinks about making a grab for the ear muffs
Laser beams fired from the Abbey just missing Charlotte
Laser beams fired from the Abbey just miss Charlotte

Once Douglas was rested from his flowerpot ordeal, he and Mark plugged away in the “Trench of the Rose”. Douglas excavated a rather nice clay tobacco pipe fragment, complete with a letter “T”, a form we haven’t come across before.

Douglas, master of the toothpick, cleans the pipe fragment
Douglas, master of the toothpick, cleans the pipe fragment

All-in-all a very satisfying two hours.

Graveyard Dig Day 33

A wee bit chilly, but pleasantly bright, no rain and the ground is actually drying out a bit in the trenches we are excavating in the graveyard. The first of our Easter sessions was a very jolly affair; we were joined by Alexander, The Bell Brothers Two, Douglas, Lee, new member Keziah and special-guest for the afternoon; Alis.

Happy diggers, doing that thing.
Happy diggers, doing that thing.
Bottom edge of gravestone revealed!
Bottom edge of gravestone revealed!

The focus for most of us was very much on bottom edges. Several of the gravestones we have found have not been excavated to their full depth yet, something we aim to put right forthwith. New leader Rob worked with Daniel and Andrew in “the enormous trench with the tiny stone” while Laura, Lee, Keziah and Alis worked in the “pirate” trench.

Meanwhile Alexander and Naomi worked all by themselves, exiled to the south east corner trench, to bottom out the rubble layer that was dumped in the 1920’s.

Is this a rose I see?
Is this a rose I see?

The drying soil made finds easier to spot and quite a few bone fragments and teeth came up around the gravestones. Meanwhile Alexander and Naomi were finding bricks, pottery fragments and ceramic roses. Douglas was kept busy for much of the time carefully cleaning the more delicate of the finds with toothbrushes and cocktail sticks (just to show how sophisticated we are).

This is definitely a rose
This is definitely a rose

The excitement culminated in Alexander’s discovery of the rim of an upright plant pot at the very base of the rubble, disappearing into the graveyard soil. He, Douglas and Lee excavated it between them, so next time we will excavate the soil within.

"Trowel and Pot Rim" Still Life, 2017
“Trowel and Pot Rim” Still Life, 2017

Roses, plant pot? Are we coming upon graveside decor or domestic rubbish?